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BRK GLOBAL HEALTHCARE JOURNAL


BRK Global Healthcare Journal is global health peer-review journal focusing on global health issues of women and other vulnerable groups around the globe. The journal accepts original work to include case studies, empirical studies, and meta-analysis and theoretical papers. The journal article is written in the 6 edition of APA format. The journal articles are published biannually. The published manuscript become the sole property of the Journal and will be copyrighted by BRK Global Healthcare Consulting, LLC In addition, the author(s) explicitly assign(s) any copyrighted ownership he/she (they) may have in such manuscript to the Journal. By submitting a manuscript to the Journal, the author(s) agree(s) to these conditions. If you are interested in submitting a journal article, please send manuscript to editor at BRKennedy @brkhealthcare@gmail.com for publication.

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Articles featured on this website are opinion pieces composed by the authors, and not necessarily those of the editors or BRK Global Healthcare Journal. While every effort is made to ensure that the content of this website is accurate.

BRK Global Healthcare Journal

ISBN: 978-1-5323-4858-7

Editorial Board

Bernice Robert Kennedy, PhD, APRN, MSN, PMH-CNS, BC

  • Professor; Researcher; Consultant
  • BRK Global Healthcare Consulting, LLC

Angela Woods-Johnson, DHSc, MSN, RN, CCM

  • TCM Case Manager
  • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Nursing Services (ONS)

Chalice C. Jenkins, Ph.D., LPC, NCC

  • Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Counseling & Family Therapy in the College of Nursing and Health Professions.
  • Drexel University

Tracee Smith, PhD

  • Adjunct Faculty in Human Services
  • Alcorn State University

Journal Articles

Year 2017
Volume 1

1. Global Perspective on Violence of Women and Children: Advocacy on Preventing 21 Century Slavery

Dr. Bernice Robert Kennedy

Abstract

Violence against women and children is a public health problem. Furthermore, violence against women is a human rights issue affecting women and children around the globe. Structure violence is often embedded in the world system which is centered on social inequalities among various populations in countries especially women and children. Lack of equality and empowerment socially, culturally and politically keep women from overcoming subjugation of violence. Around the globe, women and children lack basic rights of protection from the abuse from perpetrators. Globalization has increased the condition for “new slavery” because it transcends national borders. Therefore, knowledge and awareness of global violence of women and children have increased globally. This paper identified the common global violence acts toward women and children around the globe. The author developed a model use as a guide for conceptualizing the social inequalities of women and children around the globe contributing to their violence: Global Model for Conceptualizing Violence against Women and Children. In this model, access to health and human services is needed for women and children victims of violence around the global. The current status and future needs of policy development are addressed.

Copyright BRK Global Healthcare Journal, 2017, 978-1-5323-4858-7

Key Words: Women, children, global violence; Inequalities; structure violence; health disparities.

Received: June 6, 2017; Accepted: July 30, 2017 ; Published: August 16, 2017

Corresponding Author: Bernice Roberts Kennedy, PhD, APRN, PMN-CNS, BC, Research Consultant, BRK Global Healthcare Consulting Firm, LLC, P.O 90899, Columbia, South Carolina, 29209, USA. E-mail: brkhealthcare@gmail.com.

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2. African American Women Speak: A Phenomenological Study of African American Women’s Beliefs and Perceptions about Compliance to Treatment Regimen in the Healthcare System

Dr. Bernice Robert Kennedy

Abstract

African Americans comprise approximately 13% of the U.S. Population; however African American women are in the upper percentile of healthcare diseases that are preventable such as cardiovascular disorders (e.g., heart disease, blood pressure, and strokes), cancer, and diabetes and HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to provide a forum for African American women living in a southeastern state of the United States to share their experiences with the healthcare system and health practices. The Health Belief Model was a useful health promotion framework in guiding this study. This study sought to answer the following research question: (a) What do African American women report about their beliefs and perceptions about affecting treatment regimen in the healthcare system. The research study consisted of 50 African American women recruited from various communities in one rural county of a southern state in United States. Results of findings consist of nine themes: The nine themes were as follows: (a) distrust of health care providers; (b) difficulties communicating to health provider; (c) poor quality of patient education instructions; (d) lack of knowledge about treatment regimen; (e) Inadequate time management and inability to manage health treatment regimen; (f) inadequate access to care; (f) unaffordable cost; (g) lack of healthy lifestyle practices; and (i) inadequate coping skills. The community /public health nurse is in a key position to advocate and promote health promotion programs for vulnerable groups in communities. Forming partnerships would be useful in developing programs to improve the overall health needs of African American women. Culture competent education for health professionals remains a critical issue in the current health system when improving compliance to treatment regimen for African American. Future research needs to examine the contributing psychosocial factors of African Americans and compliance to treatment regime.

Copyright BRK Global Healthcare Journal, 2017, 978-1-5323-4858-7

Key Words: African American women; compliance; treatment regimen; health belief; health disparities; access to care; culture competent.

Received: June 6, 2017; Accepted: July 30, 2017 ; Published: August 16, 2017

Corresponding Author: Bernice Roberts Kennedy, PhD, APRN, PMN-CNS, BC, Research Consultant, BRK Global Healthcare Consulting Firm, LLC, P.O 90899, Columbia, South Carolina, 29209, USA. E-mail: brkhealthcare@gmail.com.

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3. Intimate Partner Violence: Promoting the Need for Adequate Screening, Assessment and Interventions for Physical and Mental Conditions Resulting from Intimate Partner Violence

Dr. Bernice Robert Kennedy

Abstract

Intimate partner violence is a public health problem having tremendous impact on women’s health. Also, intimidate partner violence, also known as domestic violence is the primary cause of injury to women in the United States. Physical and psychiatric problems are the result of domestic violence with victims having increase use of health services compared to those not abused. Often, domestic violence is not identified in the health services organizations when victims access health care. This analytical review of the literature addressed existing research and literature on the current status of intimate partner violence. The Holistic Model Based on Adequate Screening, Assessment and Interventions for Improving the Health Outcomes in Victims of Intimate Partner Violence is a useful model for guiding health professionals in recognizing the relevant of violence when women present certain illnesses in diverse health services organizations. Strategies for improving the health outcomes for this group include: (a) adequate screening, assessment and interventions; (b) more education for health professionals on assessing victims of violence; (c) domestic violence included in the curriculum of universities and colleges for health professionals; (d) continuing education on domestic violence in the workplace; and (e) assess for signs and symptoms of domestic violence and conduct valid screening and assessment tools on patients in certain health services organizations when women access care. More policy development is needed for victims of intimate partner violence to improve health outcomes.

Copyright BRK Global Healthcare Journal, 2017, 978-1-5323-4858-7

Key Words: Women, domestic violence; intimate partner violence ; inequalities; physical health conditions; mental health conditions; screening; assessment; intervention.

Received: June 6, 2017; Accepted: July 30, 2017 ; Published: August 16, 2017

Corresponding Author: Bernice Roberts Kennedy, PhD, APRN, PMN-CNS, BC, Research Consultant, BRK Global Healthcare Consulting Firm, LLC, P.O 90899, Columbia, South Carolina, 29209, USA. E-mail: brkhealthcare@gmail.com.

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